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Quick Summary

At the American Library Association (ALA) Annual Conference, Bonnie Tijerina from Data & Society, and Seeta Pena Gangadharan from New America’s Open Technology Institute, creatively co-presented “The Data Privacy Project – Everything You Thought You Knew (But May Have Had Wrong) About Privacy." Presenters shared the history and partners of the Data Privacy Project as well as outputs, such as the Data Privacy Project Curriculum, which includes a facilitator’s guide, presentation slides, and handouts.

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The ALA 2017 Annual Conference took place in Chicago, IL June 22-27 and as usual had many great sessions for attendees amid some delightful summer weather!

Bonnie Tijerina from Data & Society, and Seeta Pena Gangadharan from New America’s Open Technology Institute, creatively co-presented “The Data Privacy Project – Everything You Thought You Knew (But May Have Had Wrong) About Privacy." Bonnie kicked off the session asking some questions regarding privacy, offering a free copy of her new book (signed even) on data privacy to the person who knew the least. The funny part was since most attendees in the session were either librarians or worked in a library in some fashion – virtually everyone knew all the answers. Seeta shared a video version of privacy information and then joined the group via computer (since she was out of the country for work) to answer really great questions from the audience. Bonnie and Seeta shared the history and partners of the Data Privacy Project as well as outputs, such as the Data Privacy Project Curriculum, which includes a facilitator’s guide, presentation slides, and handouts. The curriculum is available to anyone and permits remix and reuse under a Share Alike 4.0 Creative Commons license. This allows any library/librarian the opportunity to visit the Data Privacy Project to learn more and use the curriculum with their library community members.

The curriculum examines factors that impact patron privacy including laws, policies, technology, and behavior; teaches about how data moves through library networks and across the Internet in general; helps to generate important questions related to your local library system policies and practices; and provides information to help libraries be able to support patrons in understanding privacy online. Overall, it is based on common patron experiences and does a great job of making learning about privacy relevant to the realities of libraries today. In addition, the curriculum includes Hands-On Tactics and Tools of Data Privacy for use in libraries. This resource is easy to use, complete with everything needed including quizzes, learning modules, slides, questions, and facilitator guides.

Written by

Dr. Jolie Graybill
Assistant Director
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Education and support for staff who build, manage, and preserve digital collections